Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.
Instead of working harder than you need to, insert a one-column table with as many rows as necessary to accommodate your list. Then, using Word's numbering feature, number that column. Finally, convert the table to text. The resulting list is a fixed numbered list, so you'll have to live with its limitations; when you can do so, this method definitely beats most alternative solutions.

It's easy to enter a SEQ field manually. Begin by pressing [Ctrl]+[F9]. When Word displays the blank field, enter seq list1, as shown in Figure A. List1 is a required argument; you can use any descriptive name you like as long as it begins with an alpha character. The parentheses distinguish the numbers within the text. They're not part of the field code. Highlight the field code and press [F9] to display the field's value. As you can see in Figure B, the first field returns (1).
It depends what the design is for the tickets. But if you set up primary text frames, linked for the area for the numbers, you can create a numbered list with the numbering format you want. Then, just pour in a whole load of paragraph returns that have that numbered list applied. And make sure each numbered paragraph is set to start in the next column.

* The solution assumes that there is only one stack to cut, but really there could be dozens of stacks. Take a run of the numbers 1-10000 for example. Let’s say you get 4-up on a sheet and the biggest stack that will fit in the guillotine is 500 sheets. A true cut and stack solution will print on the first stack 1-500, 501-1000, 1001-1500, 1501-2000. Ideal because the numbers can be guillotined and placed back onto a pallet for its next process. It also means I can provide these numbers first to the client and then they can wait for the other numbers (in case they had run out of stock and were in a hurry for replenishment stock). The solution doesn’t do that – instead, the first 500 stack will have the numbers 1-500, 2501-3000, 5001-5500, 7501-8000. That means not only is placement back onto the pallet confusing, but the customer has to wait for the artwork to be completely printed before even getting the first half of numbers. True, I could run the script several times to get the appropriate stacks, but why should I if the script did what I wanted? Especially if there are hundreds of stacks to print?


If you’re producing any kind of numbered items in-house that are multiple-up on a sheet where you need to control all the variables to meet your production needs, the autonumbering feature through numbered lists is the way to go! Just step and repeat away & InDesign will do all the work. No need to fool with a seperate “numbers” file or deal with a data merged document. I think it’s by far the best option for basic numbering.
See Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering.
I have a large job for a client who uses antique computers. They are so old that he can't run Lightroom. As a workaround, I posted the images I wanted him to look at on SmugMug and we had a disaster. Their sequencing on screen does not match my "as shot" sorting on my Lightroom (4). Is there a way I can print sequential serial numbers/ids on my images before I upload them to SmugMug so we are always talking about the same image?

If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don't need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number)
If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don't need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number) sequential numbering using publisher
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